Mortar, not cannons.

  • With the introduction of the rowboat cannon, there may be the intention, or requests, to have cannons in place of the harpoons in front of the ship, as in the rowboat the harpoon has been replaced by a cannon, and this has not proved to be a difficult thing to do.
    While this idea sounds like a lot of fun to me, and I like the many possibilities for the naval battles that would be created, I understand how much it would tip the balance in favor of a pursuer than someone on the run. And to balance the battle there would have to be a cannon in the back of the ship so that whoever was fleeing could return fire to the pursuer. But I think that would turn the ships into veritable walking strongholds, especially the galleon, and perhaps the game would be more unbalanced in the general context than balanced in just a chase situation.
    So what if we had a mortar instead of frontal cannons? The mortar would allow shooting in any 360° region, including targets that were behind the ship, but its disadvantage is that it would not be a direct line shot like cannons, but would have to be a calculated shot with a parabolic trajectory, perhaps something similar to the rocks thrown by the volcanoes in Devil's Roar.
    I know that with cannons we can shoot straight up, but the range is limited, and a mortar is specific for this type of shot, with much more range. That way the gunners would have a new weapon to play with and more possibilities to adventure and fight would arise, without leaving as much OP as frontal cannons for the ships.
    Perhaps, in the future, if this, or something similar, is implemented, players would have to choose between equipment in front of the ship, harpoons, mortar, or cannon, according to the type of navigation they are planning to do that day, doing this on the outpost's shipwrigt before they set sail, costing or not some resource to make this exchange.

  • 25
    Posts
    3.4k
    Views
    feedback2.6kgeneral1.7kcommunity1.5kjust for fun756competition297
  • hmmm i would love to have mortars added:)

  • I said this on another post and I'll say it here:
    Mortars are an indirect-fire weapon, meaning they have a rough area in which they may land. Firing mortars, especially older mortars (mainly used for sieges on land) require two (or more to fire effectively) people to load, charge and fire. Not only does this mean coordination, (unlikely among open crews) mortars have quite a lot of recoil. This recoil would sink the back (or front) of the ship dangerously low in the water, possibly capsizing the ship.
    To add, old mortars require a large amount of gunpowder to fire and their ammo is much heavier than the ammo of a cannon, which is a cannonball. Also, mortars were almost never used in naval combat at any point in history. Here is a Wikipedia page for reference. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mortar_(weapon))
    Note how there is only one use of mortars in naval warfare, and this was during the very early 1400's.
    Besides, mortars would take the challenge out of almost any PvE thing that is on land.
    Plus, here are some questions:

    • How do you aim it?
    • Will different ships have different variants? If so, how does the affect balance?
    • Is the ammo explosive or just a cannonball?
    • What happens when a round lands directly onto the enemy ship? (As of right now, a hole is created below deck, which doesn't make very much sense, but creating holes above deck isn't that fair for the opposition)
  • I could get behind a findable (you shouldn't be able to purchase supplies) mortar shell. With additional physics effects when you fire and no additional aim assists.

  • @scurvywoof said in Mortar, not cannons.:

    I said this on another post and I'll say it here:
    Mortars are an indirect-fire weapon, meaning they have a rough area in which they may land. Firing mortars, especially older mortars (mainly used for sieges on land) require two (or more to fire effectively) people to load, charge and fire. Not only does this mean coordination, (unlikely among open crews) mortars have quite a lot of recoil. This recoil would sink the back (or front) of the ship dangerously low in the water, possibly capsizing the ship.

    If we go in that direction to discuss the idea, then the cannons in real life also needed more than one person to operate, firing, cleaning the mouth of the cannon, placing the thruster, then the ammunition, and finally firing itself. As for the recoil, I believe they were on fixed bases so there's no problem with that. The cannons also have recoils, and not so the ship swings to the side, except if it is not moving, and I do not see anyone in the game having to push the cannon forward novamento because of the recoil after a shot

    To add, old mortars require a large amount of gunpowder to fire and their ammo is much heavier than the ammo of a cannon, which is a cannonball.

    The ammo would be the same one we used on the cannons. In real life, ammunition was more powerful because mortars were used against fortifications, walls, castles, and so they needed a lot of explosive cargo. Which obviously wasn't worth it when it came to hitting wooden boats or people.

    Also, mortars were almost never used in naval combat at any point in history. Here is a Wikipedia page for reference. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mortar_(weapon))

    Note how there is only one use of mortars in naval warfare, and this was during the very early 1400's.

    Okay, let's do it. SoT is a pirate-themed fantasy world, not a mirror of our world in the age of piracy. If we're going to base ourselves on the real world, then we throw ourselves out of the cannons, catch our breath by eating a banana, among other things, they should be removed from the game because that's not how it works, and that's not how it works today

    Besides, mortars would take the challenge out of almost any PvE thing that is on land.
    Maybe...

    Plus, here are some questions:

    • How do you aim it?

    The aim would be the same as with the cannons, with practice. How do you do it with long shots? Over time you learn that if you climb the cannon more or less, the cannonball will fall at a certain point at a certain distance from the ship. And with the mortar it would be the same thing, maybe an indicator of how many degrees you tilted the mortar, but no arrows showing the trajectory of the shot

    • Will different ships have different variants? If so, how does the affect balance?

    Obviously not. The cannons that exist in the Galleon are the same ones that exist in the brig and the same ones that exist in the sloop, as well as the harpoons. Then there's no reason to be different with a mortar

    • Is the ammo explosive or just a cannonball?

    We'd shoot the same things we shot with the cannons, including ourselves. Although I liked the idea of a heavier ammo and with greater power of destruction, if it is an ammunition for exclusive use of the mortar, giving a unique use to them

    • What happens when a round lands directly onto the enemy ship? (As of right now, a hole is created below deck, which doesn't make very much sense, but creating holes above deck isn't that fair for the opposition)

    Okay, shots hitting above deck really shouldn't make holes below the water line, and I agree with that. But a shot coming from above and hitting the Wheel or mast for example would do the same damage as a cannon shot, even if a chainshot is used. In addition to that a good cannonboat can hit a cursed cannonball and get an edge in battle, as well as hit a blunderbomb, throwing the crew into the water or blowing up some keg that is on board.
    The tactic here is to go draining the opponent's resources. But it's worth remembering that I've seen shots hitting the top of the deck, and drilling holes in the hull, especially in sloops and brigs

  • Forward and Rear mounted weapons opens up a can of worms I'd rather keep closed. It just becomes a giant balancing act. I would also like to point out that the lead most ship, with its rear mount, in a chase, will always have the advantage over the chaser, with its forward mounted one. I'm no physicist, but the lead ship will always outrange them due to the path of travel affecting the range. Being able to cripple a ship through destroying its mast, with the person having zero counter-play besides disengage, is rather dumb.

    I'd rather have different ammo types, curses, or other new tools instead of chase effecting cannons/mortars. They just sound unfun to play against as a chaser. A role already plagued with balancing issues as is.

  • @scurvywoof
    Speaking of historical facts, I found this article through a link, within the same link you sent.

    (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bomb_vessel)

    He speaks of mortar ships and their use throughout history. They were used even in the 20th century, and even by the Royal Navy.

  • @maironds88 said in Mortar, not cannons.:

    @scurvywoof
    Speaking of historical facts, I found this article through a link, within the same link you sent.

    (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bomb_vessel)

    He speaks of mortar ships and their use throughout history. They were used even in the 20th century, and even by the Royal Navy.

    Those ships use the mortar for targets on land. Doesn't seem to be viable in ship vs ship.

  • IMO, the mortar is simply too complex of a thing to be added. There are far too many variables that would have to be figured out in order to make it balanced, and I honestly don't think you could have that, along with ease of use or truly fun and actually useful gameplay.

  • @lem0n-curry
    Yes, the targets are on the ground. The point of the article was only because he had mentioned that the effects that the recoil of a mortar would cause on the ship, perhaps almost sinking, making them impractical to use on a vessel
    It wasn't to reinforce my idea, precisely because I told you earlier not to rely on real life when we're going to discuss something from SoT

  • @pithyrumble said in Mortar, not cannons.:

    I could get behind a findable (you shouldn't be able to purchase supplies) mortar shell. With additional physics effects when you fire and no additional aim assists.

    Yes, finding a charge for the mortar should be more difficult and rare than finding a chainshot, especially if it's a single projectile with a little more destructive power

  • @nabberwar said in Mortar, not cannons.:

    Forward and Rear mounted weapons opens up a can of worms I'd rather keep closed. It just becomes a giant balancing act. I would also like to point out that the lead most ship, with its rear mount, in a chase, will always have the advantage over the chaser, with its forward mounted one. I'm no physicist, but the lead ship will always outrange them due to the path of travel affecting the range. Being able to cripple a ship through destroying its mast, with the person having zero counter-play besides disengage, is rather dumb.

    I'd rather have different ammo types, curses, or other new tools instead of chase effecting cannons/mortars. They just sound unfun to play against as a chaser. A role already plagued with balancing issues as is.

    Perhaps a means of testing whether a mortar would be viable or not would be to make one of these in the skeletons Fort available for them to shoot at players' ships, or have a mortar on some skeleton ship to test in a ship-to-ship battle. But maybe that's something we'd only see in the insider

  • @galactic-geek said in Mortar, not cannons.:

    IMO, the mortar is simply too complex of a thing to be added. There are far too many variables that would have to be figured out in order to make it balanced, and I honestly don't think you could have that, along with ease of use or truly fun and actually useful gameplay.

    Speaking of technical issues and how complex an implementation can be I'd rather leave it to a developer to check. In the end, if they decide they should insert into the game, they will get around the difficulties and do it, after all that's what they work on

    I may be wrong, but I think there's something like the trajectory of a mortar shot in the game, the rocks thrown by the volcanoes

  • @maironds88

    Perhaps a means of testing whether a mortar would be viable or not would be to make one of these in the skeletons Fort available for them to shoot at players' ships, or have a mortar on some skeleton ship to test in a ship-to-ship battle. But maybe that's something we'd only see in the insider

    Why waste time and money in order to develop assets that have a high chance of not making the cut? Typically, if it makes it to the Insider, high chance its going live. What you suggest isn't a small investment. Its not as if you are just tweaking balance numbers, you are fully developing an interactable model with associated animations. This isn't a type of thing you just test on a whim.

    My take on this is Rare should just stay in their lane and keep it simple with the current cannon system. No need for an entirely new device to deliver explosives. Just keep it simple and expand on the variety of munitions for the current cannon system.

  • @nabberwar disse em Mortar, not cannons.:

    @maironds88

    Perhaps a means of testing whether a mortar would be viable or not would be to make one of these in the skeletons Fort available for them to shoot at players' ships, or have a mortar on some skeleton ship to test in a ship-to-ship battle. But maybe that's something we'd only see in the insider

    Why waste time and money in order to develop assets that have a high chance of not making the cut? Typically, if it makes it to the Insider, high chance its going live. What you suggest isn't a small investment. Its not as if you are just tweaking balance numbers, you are fully developing an interactable model with associated animations. This isn't a type of thing you just test on a whim.

    My take on this is Rare should just stay in their lane and keep it simple with the current cannon system. No need for an entirely new device to deliver explosives. Just keep it simple and expand on the variety of munitions for the current cannon system.

    Okay, I get your point.
    Going back to the beginning of the proposal, the entire context of this post would only be an option if developers want to add cannons in front of ships, instead of harpoons.

    Anyway, thanks everyone for the healthy discussion.

  • @maironds88 said in Mortar, not cannons.:

    @scurvywoof said in Mortar, not cannons.:

    I said this on another post and I'll say it here:
    Mortars are an indirect-fire weapon, meaning they have a rough area in which they may land. Firing mortars, especially older mortars (mainly used for sieges on land) require two (or more to fire effectively) people to load, charge and fire. Not only does this mean coordination, (unlikely among open crews) mortars have quite a lot of recoil. This recoil would sink the back (or front) of the ship dangerously low in the water, possibly capsizing the ship.

    If we go in that direction to discuss the idea, then the cannons in real life also needed more than one person to operate, firing, cleaning the mouth of the cannon, placing the thruster, then the ammunition, and finally firing itself. As for the recoil, I believe they were on fixed bases so there's no problem with that. The cannons also have recoils, and not so the ship swings to the side, except if it is not moving, and I do not see anyone in the game having to push the cannon forward novamento because of the recoil after a shot

    A mortar (especially the older ones) have a lot of recoil. Hence the fixed bases. However, on ships, the momentum of the recoil would just go straight through to the ship, having practically the same affect either way.

    To add, old mortars require a large amount of gunpowder to fire and their ammo is much heavier than the ammo of a cannon, which is a cannonball. >
    The ammo would be the same one we used on the cannons. In real life, ammunition was more powerful because mortars were used against fortifications, walls, castles, and so they needed a lot of explosive cargo. Which obviously wasn't worth it when it came to hitting wooden boats or people.

    Except, mortars fire a much larger round than a cannon. The opening which the rounds are fired is massive. This is because, well, obviously, they would want to fit as much explosive mass into the ball as possible, thus creating maximum damage.

    Also, mortars were almost never used in naval combat at any point in history. Here is a Wikipedia page for reference. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mortar_(weapon))

    Note how there is only one use of mortars in naval warfare, and this was during the very early 1400's.

    Okay, let's do it. SoT is a pirate-themed fantasy world, not a mirror of our world in the age of piracy. If we're going to base ourselves on the real world, then we throw ourselves out of the cannons, catch our breath by eating a banana, among other things, they should be removed from the game because that's not how it works, and that's not how it works today

    I’m fairly certain the Sea of Thieves is set somewhere around Indonesia, a real life country. (Not sure how true this is, but I remember Falcore saying it at one point a couple years back)
    But, yes, you are correct in saying SOT is a pirate-themed fantasy world.

    Besides, mortars would take the challenge out of almost any PvE thing that is on land.
    Maybe...

    Plus, here are some questions:

    • How do you aim it?

    The aim would be the same as with the cannons, with practice. How do you do it with long shots? Over time you learn that if you climb the cannon more or less, the cannonball will fall at a certain point at a certain distance from the ship. And with the mortar it would be the same thing, maybe an indicator of how many degrees you tilted the mortar, but no arrows showing the trajectory of the shot

    Erm… MORTAR! The enemy ship will see it coming from a mile off, easily pin pointing where the mortar will land. Secondly, a mortar is vastly different when it comes to aiming a cannon. In modern day life, you get given COORDINATES and are told to fire X_X_X. Sea of Thieves has no proper coordinates, apart from what’s on the map. So, again, how do you aim the mortar?

    • Will different ships have different variants? If so, how does the affect balance?

    Obviously not. The cannons that exist in the Galleon are the same ones that exist in the brig and the same ones that exist in the sloop, as well as the harpoons. Then there's no reason to be different with a mortar

    The sloop is tiny, leaving almost no room for a practical use of the mortar. Also, chances are you would hit your own mast when firing from the front if you are moving.

    • Is the ammo explosive or just a cannonball?

    We'd shoot the same things we shot with the cannons, including ourselves. Although I liked the idea of a heavier ammo and with greater power of destruction, if it is an ammunition for exclusive use of the mortar, giving a unique use to them

    Uh huh, and, again, how do you aim it? The only viable use for a mortar I could imagine would be a specially modified one from the shipwrights that allows you to fire high up in the air in order to look for ships or admire the view. There would be a fuse similar to that of a firework.

    • What happens when a round lands directly onto the enemy ship? (As of right now, a hole is created below deck, which doesn't make very much sense, but creating holes above deck isn't that fair for the opposition)

    Okay, shots hitting above deck really shouldn't make holes below the water line, and I agree with that. But a shot coming from above and hitting the Wheel or mast for example would do the same damage as a cannon shot, even if a chainshot is used. In addition to that a good cannonboat can hit a cursed cannonball and get an edge in battle, as well as hit a blunderbomb, throwing the crew into the water or blowing up some keg that is on board.
    The tactic here is to go draining the opponent's resources. But it's worth remembering that I've seen shots hitting the top of the deck, and drilling holes in the hull, especially in sloops and brigs

    Yeah, and it really does not make sense. Plus, hit registration would make mortars so clunky and unusable anyway.

  • @maironds88 said in Mortar, not cannons.:

    @scurvywoof
    Speaking of historical facts, I found this article through a link, within the same link you sent.

    (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bomb_vessel)

    He speaks of mortar ships and their use throughout history. They were used even in the 20th century, and even by the Royal Navy.

    Yes, and do you know what the page said? Here, “Bomb vessels were specialized ships designed for bombarding (hence the name) fixed positions on land.”

  • Someone here didn’t like chasing a ship. That explains the frontal non cannon idea.

  • @burnbacon said in Mortar, not cannons.:

    Someone here didn’t like chasing a ship. That explains the frontal non cannon idea.

    Quite the contrary, my friend. I even told you how much fun it would be to have cannons in place of the harpoons But unfortunately I can't just think of my side, it would sound exactly like the people who come here complaining about portal jumps made by the reapers, and reapers who complain about fugitives running into the red sea, or double shooters asking to nerf the sword, and swordsmen asking to eliminate the double tap, among many other examples of each looking only his side.
    The goal here is to seek balance so that it is fair to everyone

  • @scurvywoof said in Mortar, not cannons.:

    @maironds88 said in Mortar, not cannons.:

    @scurvywoof said in Mortar, not cannons.:

    I said this on another post and I'll say it here:
    Mortars are an indirect-fire weapon, meaning they have a rough area in which they may land. Firing mortars, especially older mortars (mainly used for sieges on land) require two (or more to fire effectively) people to load, charge and fire. Not only does this mean coordination, (unlikely among open crews) mortars have quite a lot of recoil. This recoil would sink the back (or front) of the ship dangerously low in the water, possibly capsizing the ship.

    If we go in that direction to discuss the idea, then the cannons in real life also needed more than one person to operate, firing, cleaning the mouth of the cannon, placing the thruster, then the ammunition, and finally firing itself. As for the recoil, I believe they were on fixed bases so there's no problem with that. The cannons also have recoils, and not so the ship swings to the side, except if it is not moving, and I do not see anyone in the game having to push the cannon forward novamento because of the recoil after a shot

    A mortar (especially the older ones) have a lot of recoil. Hence the fixed bases. However, on ships, the momentum of the recoil would just go straight through to the ship, having practically the same affect either way.

    To add, old mortars require a large amount of gunpowder to fire and their ammo is much heavier than the ammo of a cannon, which is a cannonball. >
    The ammo would be the same one we used on the cannons. In real life, ammunition was more powerful because mortars were used against fortifications, walls, castles, and so they needed a lot of explosive cargo. Which obviously wasn't worth it when it came to hitting wooden boats or people.

    Except, mortars fire a much larger round than a cannon. The opening which the rounds are fired is massive. This is because, well, obviously, they would want to fit as much explosive mass into the ball as possible, thus creating maximum damage.

    Also, mortars were almost never used in naval combat at any point in history. Here is a Wikipedia page for reference. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mortar_(weapon))

    Note how there is only one use of mortars in naval warfare, and this was during the very early 1400's.

    Okay, let's do it. SoT is a pirate-themed fantasy world, not a mirror of our world in the age of piracy. If we're going to base ourselves on the real world, then we throw ourselves out of the cannons, catch our breath by eating a banana, among other things, they should be removed from the game because that's not how it works, and that's not how it works today

    I’m fairly certain the Sea of Thieves is set somewhere around Indonesia, a real life country. (Not sure how true this is, but I remember Falcore saying it at one point a couple years back)
    But, yes, you are correct in saying SOT is a pirate-themed fantasy world.

    Besides, mortars would take the challenge out of almost any PvE thing that is on land.
    Maybe...

    Plus, here are some questions:

    • How do you aim it?

    The aim would be the same as with the cannons, with practice. How do you do it with long shots? Over time you learn that if you climb the cannon more or less, the cannonball will fall at a certain point at a certain distance from the ship. And with the mortar it would be the same thing, maybe an indicator of how many degrees you tilted the mortar, but no arrows showing the trajectory of the shot

    Erm… MORTAR! The enemy ship will see it coming from a mile off, easily pin pointing where the mortar will land. Secondly, a mortar is vastly different when it comes to aiming a cannon. In modern day life, you get given COORDINATES and are told to fire X_X_X. Sea of Thieves has no proper coordinates, apart from what’s on the map. So, again, how do you aim the mortar?

    • Will different ships have different variants? If so, how does the affect balance?

    Obviously not. The cannons that exist in the Galleon are the same ones that exist in the brig and the same ones that exist in the sloop, as well as the harpoons. Then there's no reason to be different with a mortar

    The sloop is tiny, leaving almost no room for a practical use of the mortar. Also, chances are you would hit your own mast when firing from the front if you are moving.

    • Is the ammo explosive or just a cannonball?

    We'd shoot the same things we shot with the cannons, including ourselves. Although I liked the idea of a heavier ammo and with greater power of destruction, if it is an ammunition for exclusive use of the mortar, giving a unique use to them

    Uh huh, and, again, how do you aim it? The only viable use for a mortar I could imagine would be a specially modified one from the shipwrights that allows you to fire high up in the air in order to look for ships or admire the view. There would be a fuse similar to that of a firework.

    • What happens when a round lands directly onto the enemy ship? (As of right now, a hole is created below deck, which doesn't make very much sense, but creating holes above deck isn't that fair for the opposition)

    Okay, shots hitting above deck really shouldn't make holes below the water line, and I agree with that. But a shot coming from above and hitting the Wheel or mast for example would do the same damage as a cannon shot, even if a chainshot is used. In addition to that a good cannonboat can hit a cursed cannonball and get an edge in battle, as well as hit a blunderbomb, throwing the crew into the water or blowing up some keg that is on board.
    The tactic here is to go draining the opponent's resources. But it's worth remembering that I've seen shots hitting the top of the deck, and drilling holes in the hull, especially in sloops and brigs

    Yeah, and it really does not make sense. Plus, hit registration would make mortars so clunky and unusable anyway.

    Okay, let's simplify things. The mortar design doesn't have to be exactly as it is, or was, in real life. It may function as the cannon of the game, but with a slightly wider skin and with a larger mouth, or exactly the same, whatever, the important thing is the concept of mortar fire, with greater range, and perhaps for this it is necessary that the velocity of the projectile is higher for it to take longer for it to slow down in the air and fall again, and that the mortar has an angulation limit so as not to be used as a superpowerful cannon.
    As for hitting the mast itself. This is already happening regardless of the speed that your boat is, example of this is using a chainshot and end up hitting the mast of the sloop itself, and as the size of the ship increases this is getting harder, but not impossible. Perhaps a higher projectile velocity eliminates the chance to hit the sloop mast itself. Or even, with the time of practice and skill acquired by the players this does not occur.
    As for seeing the shot from afar and being able to dodge.... that's one of the points here
    "Swerve or get hit"
    The swerve maneuver causes the ship, whether pursuer or runner, to exit the straight line trajectory, which will reduce or increase the distance between the two vessels. Then each crew decides what best at the moment, be hit and fix the damage but keep the route or dodge the shot and take the consequences of the maneuver.

    As for the scope, the coordinate system applies to modern mortars, and from those very large ones, where the shooter doesn't even see the target. Small mortars, or old ones, use tables, where each angulation and according to the relief of the terrain, will result in a point that the projectile will fall, but in general, with the experience of the shooter, a visual adjustment of the angle and terrain, or the ocean in the case of SoT, around are enough to predict the trajectory of the shot.
    I see no need for sophistication to aim for a mortar in the game, the aim of the cannons is totally manual and we learn, at least those who dedicated themselves to it, in this way. But if you think you should have a crosshair, what do you suggest?

  • @maironds88 Modern day mortars are actually a lot smaller than those of medieval times and before.
    alt text
    Look at the size of that thing! Do you really think a sloop can have BOTH of it's harpoons removed for those? They're massive!

    alt text
    Compared to the 60mm mortar tube, used by militaries all around our modern day world.

    alt text
    Even the 120mm mortar tube isn't that big.

    This is already happening regardless of the speed that your boat is, example of this is using a chainshot and end up hitting the mast of the sloop itself, and as the size of the ship increases this is getting harder, but not impossible.

    Yes, but the cannon on a sloop has to be aiming for the mast at a certain angle. The mast must also be on a certain angle, meaning it doesn't happen accidently.

    The swerve maneuver causes the ship, whether pursuer or runner, to exit the straight line trajectory, which will reduce or increase the distance between the two vessels. Then each crew decides what best at the moment, be hit and fix the damage but keep the route or dodge the shot and take the consequences of the maneuver.

    Maybe, but the chasing crew will likely not have to swerve because the mortar is an indirect fire weapon. The crew will only need to swerve if the mortar round will hit.

    But if you think you should have a crosshair, what do you suggest?

    Well, I would suggest a much more sophisticated coordinates system with a sophisticated aiming mechanic, but, I know almost no one would agree with me on that, so I'll leave that question be.
    Anyway, as interesting this topic is, it's not something I can ever find myself coming around to, regardless of what is said. So, let's just agree to disagree and call it a day, savvy?

  • @scurvywoof said in Mortar, not cannons.:

    @maironds88 Modern day mortars are actually a lot smaller than those of medieval times and before.
    alt text
    Look at the size of that thing! Do you really think a sloop can have BOTH of it's harpoons removed for those? They're massive!

    😁😁😁😁
    We're holding on to oore to the real world a lot, they don't have to be like this
    😁😁😁😁

    alt text
    Compared to the 60mm mortar tube, used by militaries all around our modern day world.

    alt text
    Even the 120mm mortar tube isn't that big.

    A mortar's aiming coordinate systems are used for mortars much larger than these. Look for self-propelled mortars

    This is already happening regardless of the speed that your boat is, example of this is using a chainshot and end up hitting the mast of the sloop itself, and as the size of the ship increases this is getting harder, but not impossible.

    Yes, but the cannon on a sloop has to be aiming for the mast at a certain angle. The mast must also be on a certain angle, meaning it doesn't happen accidently.

    The swerve maneuver causes the ship, whether pursuer or runner, to exit the straight line trajectory, which will reduce or increase the distance between the two vessels. Then each crew decides what best at the moment, be hit and fix the damage but keep the route or dodge the shot and take the consequences of the maneuver.

    Maybe, but the chasing crew will likely not have to swerve because the mortar is an indirect fire weapon. The crew will only need to swerve if the mortar round will hit.

    But if you think you should have a crosshair, what do you suggest?

    Well, I would suggest a much more sophisticated coordinates system with a sophisticated aiming mechanic, but, I know almost no one would agree with me on that, so I'll leave that question be.
    Anyway, as interesting this topic is, it's not something I can ever find myself coming around to, regardless of what is said. So, let's just agree to disagree and call it a day, savvy?

    😁
    Yes, I agree to disagree. Sounds good to me.
    Enjoy
    🍍

  • @maironds88
    Earlier you were talking about how real life shouldn't be an argument when we're talking about SoT because we've got things like eating food to catch your breath.
    The point of talking about real life is to see if something fits into Sea of Thieves. Sea of Thieves is about the golden age of piracy, and the point is that if a mortar is not something that ships, and especially pirates, used often, then there isn't a basis for putting one in the game. We don't talk about real life to show how unrealistic something is, only to see if something fits the SoT's golden age of piracy.

  • @grumpyw01f said in Mortar, not cannons.:

    @maironds88
    Earlier you were talking about how real life shouldn't be an argument when we're talking about SoT because we've got things like eating food to catch your breath.

    Yes, It is a pirate theme fantasy world

    The point of talking about real life is to see if something fits into Sea of Thieves. Sea of Thieves is about the golden age of piracy, and the point is that if a mortar is not something that ships, and especially pirates, used often, then there isn't a basis for putting one in the game. We don't talk about real life to show how unrealistic something is, only to see if something fits the SoT's golden age of piracy.

    I don't think it's about the golden age of piracy, at least not ours. If it were, where are the mentions of historical facts that happened? Where are the tales about Black beard, about Calico Jack? What about the mentions of the British Empire, about the Spanish empire.
    About things in real life fit into the world of SoT. Then why do we have cursed cannonballs? Why do we face skeletons, ghosts and ocean crowlers?

    But I think that's a path that will deviate from the purpose of this topic, and I would be happy to talk about it in a topic for that purpose
    And just reinforcing that I suggested the mortars as an option if they want developers to think about inserting front cannons into the ships, so they wouldn't get so OP

  • @maironds88

    About things in real life fit into the world of SoT. Then why do we have cursed cannonballs? Why do we face skeletons, ghosts and ocean crowlers?

    Again you diverge into talk about how things in SoT don't exist in real life, when I literally said that we only talk about real life to see if something fits the aesthetic.
    But to answer those questions, cursed cannonballs come from stories of curses, and as an extent of that, Flameheart's cannons would curse enemy ships, and now all cursed cannonballs come from the curses of Flameheart's cannons.
    Skeletons and ghosts come from stories of course, like the first PotC movie.
    Ocean crawlers are an extent of siren stories.
    In Sea of Thieves, the stories are real.

    I don't think it's about the golden age of piracy, at least not ours. If it were, where are the mentions of historical facts that happened? Where are the tales about Black beard, about Calico Jack? What about the mentions of the British Empire, about the Spanish empire.

    First of all, one of Mike Chapman's biggest statements is about how Sea of Thieves is a world where the golden age of piracy can live on forever.
    For mentions of historical facts, in the Sea of Thieves, who you are outside means nothing. That's in one of the Pendragon comics. But stories still get through. Jack says "I'm Jack Sparrow, but you probably already know that." And all of the PotC ships are inspired by a legend. So I think that those legends are there, just not brought into the forefront often.
    In general, the legends present in Sea of Thieves come from the Sea of Thieves.

25
Posts
3.4k
Views
feedback2.6kgeneral1.7kcommunity1.5kjust for fun756competition297
1 out of 25